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Porirua basin

Porirua is my home

Our local suburbs

 

AOTEA
 
Gorse-covered hills continue to make way for shiny new homes in the upmarket suburb of Aotea, with more new homes yet to come. Since the first families moved to Aotea in 2004, the 246-hectare subdivision has developed nearly 950 sections in 11 neighbourhoods whose names, like Pinnacle and Plateau, drip with exclusivity. Today, diggers continue to carve out building sites for the nearly 500 lots left to develop before Aotea is complete (sometime between 2017 and 2020). To many, Aotea embodies the suburban dream with its choice of buy or build, value-for-money executive homes, immaculate streets, and those killer views of rolling hills and the harbour. This is no haphazard development: experienced firm, Carrus Corporation, is proactively creating a distinctive character and identity for Aotea through carefully-controlled growth, clever landscaping and design, plenty of green spaces, and consultation with the community as the young suburb matures and develops fully.
Gorse-covered hills continue to make way for shiny new homes in the upmarket suburb of Aotea, with more new homes yet to come. Since the first families moved to Aotea in 2004, the 246-hectare subdivision has developed nearly 950  sections in 11 neighbourhoods whose names, like Pinnacle and Plateau, drip with exclusivity. Today, diggers continue to carve out building sites for the nearly 500 lots left to develop before Aotea is complete (sometime between 2017 and 2020). To many, Aotea embodies the suburban dream with its choice of buy or build, value-for-money executive homes, immaculate streets, and those killer views of rolling hills and the harbour. This is no haphazard development: experienced firm, Carrus Corporation, is proactively creating a distinctive character and identity for Aotea through carefully-controlled growth, clever landscaping and design, plenty of green spaces, and consultation with the community as the young suburb matures and develops fully. - See more at: http://www.livebeyond.co.nz/suburb/aotea#sthash.6HKmG6Ay.dpuf
Gorse-covered hills continue to make way for shiny new homes in the upmarket suburb of Aotea, with more new homes yet to come. Since the first families moved to Aotea in 2004, the 246-hectare subdivision has developed nearly 950  sections in 11 neighbourhoods whose names, like Pinnacle and Plateau, drip with exclusivity. Today, diggers continue to carve out building sites for the nearly 500 lots left to develop before Aotea is complete (sometime between 2017 and 2020). To many, Aotea embodies the suburban dream with its choice of buy or build, value-for-money executive homes, immaculate streets, and those killer views of rolling hills and the harbour. This is no haphazard development: experienced firm, Carrus Corporation, is proactively creating a distinctive character and identity for Aotea through carefully-controlled growth, clever landscaping and design, plenty of green spaces, and consultation with the community as the young suburb matures and develops fully. - See more at: http://www.livebeyond.co.nz/suburb/aotea#sthash.6HKmG6Ay.dpuf
Example of walkway in Aotea.
ASCOT PARK
 
Stick a pin in the middle of a map of Porirua and it won't land far from Ascot Park. This is often the suburb of choice for first-home buyers for two very good reasons - its central location means it's close to Porirua's CBD, beaches, the motorway and public transport and its comparatively modest house prices means homeowners can manage the mortgage payments and still have a life. Ascot Park's subdued property prices are primarily because the neighbourhood is traditionally considered to be a part of Porirua East, an area whose image problem persists. However, people forget that it also borders four affluent suburbs (Whitby, Papakowhai, Paremata and Aotea), that its kindergarten and primary school have excellent reputations, and that it is home to the Wellington region's biggest rugby-league club, the Porirua Vikings. As for the curiously wonderful street names like Syntax Place, Sombrero View and Limerick Grove, that's down to the three city councillors who, in 1969, named the new suburb after Royal Ascot Racecourse in England and its roads after famous race horses of the day.
Gorse-covered hills continue to make way for shiny new homes in the upmarket suburb of Aotea, with more new homes yet to come. Since the first families moved to Aotea in 2004, the 246-hectare subdivision has developed nearly 950  sections in 11 neighbourhoods whose names, like Pinnacle and Plateau, drip with exclusivity. Today, diggers continue to carve out building sites for the nearly 500 lots left to develop before Aotea is complete (sometime between 2017 and 2020). To many, Aotea embodies the suburban dream with its choice of buy or build, value-for-money executive homes, immaculate streets, and those killer views of rolling hills and the harbour. This is no haphazard development: experienced firm, Carrus Corporation, is proactively creating a distinctive character and identity for Aotea through carefully-controlled growth, clever landscaping and design, plenty of green spaces, and consultation with the community as the young suburb matures and develops fully. - See more at: http://www.livebeyond.co.nz/suburb/aotea#sthash.6HKmG6Ay.dpuf
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CAMBORNE
 
Entirely residential, Camborne is classic suburbia, Kiwi-style, with its quiet cul-de-sacs, pohutukawas, trilling Tuis, views and rows of weatherboard bungalows. Created on the steep hills between SH1 and Pautahanui Inlet from the late 1960s, Camborne's established area feels like a 1970s time capsule. But head east or north to its small, but upmarket subdivisions and you're firmly in the 21st century. Over the last decade, this commuter suburb has grown bigger and wealthier as people have caught on to Camborne's charms. It's a private, peaceful neighbourhood that's still oh-so-close to the beach, shops, schools, train and parks just down the road in Mana and Plimmerton. Yet it still feels semi-rural, with that stunning outlook over the Pautahanui Inlet and undulating countryside to the east, and the open sea and Mana Island to the west.
Example of homes in Camborne.
 CANNONS CREEK
 
The locals have always been loyal to Cannons Creek and it is slowly but surely transforming into a community that attracts first home buyers from across the region. Along the way it is shaking off the negative reputation that has dogged it for so long; the stereotype of poverty, crime and rundown state rentals. Crime rates have plummeted, rainbow-coloured murals have replaced tagging and housing upgrades are underway. Increasingly, a sense of pride seems to percolate through the neighbourhood, while new families are moving in and enthusiastically smartening up former state houses. Cannons Creek may not be rich in dollar terms but it is in cultures, families and passion for a place where neighbours know more than just each other's names. It's a place nowadays where people put "I Love Cannons Creek" stickers on their fridges and cars - and mean it. Critically, it's also an area that represents real value for first time buyers, young families and investors alike.
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 JUDGEFORD

Founding settler, Alfred Judge, once lived beside a crossing in the river here, and as a result the name, "Judge's Ford" - less of a mouthful than Pauatahanui Small Farm Settlements - was coined and stuck. The rural valley east of Pauatahanui was settled from the 1850s by European pioneers, and the roads still proudly bear their names. In 1874, a horse-and-cart track connected the Hutt Valley with Porirua via Judgeford, which led to the main route north. By the late 19th century, a small settlement and school had sprung up here, propped up by sawmilling and sheep farming. While tracts of land are still farmed, the area's now known for its hundreds of lifestyle blocks. Families chasing the lifestyle block dream now populate Judgeford's main road and the roads that shoot off it. As with neighbouring suburbs, the advent of the Transmission Gully project is eagerly awaited by local residents because it is expected to significantly shorten the half-hour commute to Wellington City.
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PAEKAKARIKI
 
For nearly a century from 1849, the narrow, winding hill road that connects Porirua with the Kapiti Coast via Pauatahanui was the main route north for horse-and-carts and, later, automobiles. Today Paekakariki Hill Road still parts the steep hills standing sentry over the sea. While pockets of land are farmed, over the last 20 years much of the land has been sliced up into residential lifestyle blocks. Here you'll find families riding horses, collecting eggs, picking their own lettuces and looking out over picturesque panoramas of rolling farmland, pine forests, native bush and coastline. Many residents feel a close connection with Pauatahanui village, where they send their children to school and fill-up on fuel and coffees en route to Wellington City (35 minutes away). Commuters' alarms can be set later once Transmission Gully - the new main highway to and from Wellington - cuts through the hill.
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PAPAKOWHAI

Backing onto bush-clad hills, Papakowhai (Maori for "land covered by kowhai trees") was developed from the early 1970s and quickly became a refuge from the rat race. Today it's a pretty, quiet suburb of curving cul-de-sacs named after Scottish rivers and bordered by mature trees, with not so much as an overgrown lawn or an untrimmed hedge. Papakowhai is a coveted address because of its green, well-established neighbourhoods, quality housing, sunny outlook, panoramic views, excellent primary school, and its proximity to the motorway, shops, outdoors and amenities. It can also claim as its own Porirua's premier reserve, Aotea Lagoon, whose paved walkway, duck pond, rose garden, petanque court, playgrounds and train rides draw families from all over Porirua. Just up the hill, The Royal New Zealand Police College and its trainees' barracks cement that feeling of safety, serenity and security.

 

 

PAREMATA
 
Paremata overlooks the place where the two arms of the harbour join hands, spanning Mana, north of Paremata Bridge, the pocket of land immediately south of the bridge, and the Golden Gate peninsula. Home to Maori from the 1400s, since the 1830s Paremata has served as a whaling station, a New Zealand Wars barracks, a Maori-Pakeha trading post, a sheep farm and a fishing hub. The first shacks were fishermen's cottages and holiday baches, with the first residential sections divvied up on the peninsula from 1921. But after the bridge and the Centennial Highway opened in the late 1930s, Paremata's popularity soared. Today it's a well-established commuter suburb where houses sell like hotcakes, the harbour takes centre stage, and people from all over flock to the well patronised shopping strip and sports complex.

 

PAUATAHANUI
 
Ever since Governor Grey and Maori chief Te Rangihaeta fought over land here during the New Zealand Wars, Pauatahanui has been a place of colourful history and changing fortunes. From 1850, what's now Pauatahanui village was a thriving horse-and-cart stop on the main route north, with inns and hotels, sawmill and school, postbox and police station. But when the railway went in at Paremata in 1885, and later the road bridge in 1936, Pauatahanui became an unnecessary detour for merchant travellers and instead became known for its timber-milling and sheep-farming. Today Pauatahanui's many lifestyle blocks are some of the closest to Wellington, attracting well-heeled families after a slice of paradise. Despite this influx of wealth, Pauatahanui village is still a simple country town with a sweet old church and rose garden full of early-settler blooms. It's a place where the shopkeepers know your name and ask after your kids. That's its charm.
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 PLIMMERTON
 
In Plimmerton, in Plimmerton, The little penguins play, And one dead albatross was found At Karehana Bay... These simple lines from a poem by the late Denis Glover, capture the essence of this naturally beautiful seaside suburb, with its birdlife and iconic beach. By the 1890s the development of the Wellington to Manawatu railway line, meant that Plimmerton's beach was swarming with picnicking Wellington families and paddling kids. Since the Centennial Highway was built in 1938, putting Plimmerton on the main arterial road out of Wellington, it began a gradual metamorphosis from a holiday hotspot into a dormitory suburb. Slowly but surely, the baches, butchers and greengrocers have made way for designer homes, cafes and gift shops. This tiny suburb (population 2000-plus) has now become one of Porirua's most affluent areas, yet it still retains the atmosphere of a small village with its beach, sun, views, culture, proximity to the great outdoors, and most of all a strong sense of community and identity.
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PUKERUA BAY
 
Pukerua Bay's most famous son is film director extraordinaire, Sir Peter Jackson, who grew up in a cliff-top house overlooking the ocean and running round the bay chasing an imaginary King Kong with an eight-mm movie camera. Today, a new generation of kids are playing chasing in the reserves, paddling in the tide and kicking balls in the quiet cul-de-sacs. Since the late 19th century, the bay, whose name means two hills, has transformed from a pa to farmland to a tiny weekend hideaway to a popular commuter suburb connected to Wellington by the railway line and SH1. It's a close-knit, family-centric community where, to borrow from a popular soap's theme song, good neighbours become good friends. And with its breathtaking views from 60-90m above sea level, and walkways and beaches on your doorstep, it's no wonder residents proudly protect its relatively unspoilt landscape from over-development.
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RANUI

In the late 19th century, the colonial villas of Ranui stood on the outskirts of the original Porirua Village, with sheep munching on the hills behind. In the 1950s, an exploding population - and new methods of building on tricky hills - saw state houses erected around the main thoroughfare, Mungavin Avenue. In the 1960s, the motorway finally separated Ranui from the city centre and a middle-class subdivision sprung up to the south. Today, this multicultural suburb, with its strong community spirit, attracts families keen on its attractive character homes, well-established feel, mature trees, colourful murals, sports facilities, and its proximity to both Porirua City Centre and Wellington CBD, just 15-20 minutes' drive away. A stunning mosaic sculpture complete with a flock of rotating birds now graces the entranceway to Ranui and eastern Porirua. During the unwrapping ceremony in late September 2013 the sculpture was blessed and named by Porirua Kaumatua Taku Parai as “Te Ra Nui”, which means “The great day”.
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TITAHI BAY
 
Few locations hold greater appeal for families and first-home buyers than this north-facing, sun-soaked bay where beachside living, apricot sunsets and million-dollar views come without the million-dollar price tag. From old character cottages to former state houses and modern-day mansions, Titahi Bay's varied housing stock tells the tale of its colourful transformation from Maori pa to early-1900s bach settlement, US military camp (during WWII) to 1950s state-house stronghold. The bay boomed in the 1960s as it transformed into a residential suburb. Today it's a close-knit village where lives aren't lived in isolation or confined to the indoors. The quality and breadth of local sports clubs is extraordinary, huge coastal-headland reserve Whitireia Park offers just about every outdoor activity imaginable, and local mums catch up at the "Desperate Housewives" social group. And it’s all just a few minutes’ drive to Porirua City Centre and a 20-minute commute to Wellington City.
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WAITANGIRUA

Waitangirua is a multicultural, largely Pacific Island area that was built on farm paddocks in the 1960s to house working-class immigrants, including rowdy Scottish, Irish, and Welsh wharfies who passed on their DNA to many of today's residents. With lots of green spaces, including the neighbouring Belmont Regional Park, Waitangirua is close to beaches, the motorway and the Porirua City Centre. Wellington CBD is an easy 20-minute drive away, but the completion of the Transmission Gully project (construction starts in 2015) will reduce that considerably. Waitangirua is often branded negatively by outsiders with long memories, who picture rundown state rentals, poverty and neglect. Today it is better known for its can-do attitude, solid, value-for-money housing, well-attended churches and “Graffiti grannies” who have banded together to virtually eliminate tagging here. An award-winning community park now sits at the heart of Waitangirua, restoring local pride and creating a popular gathering place for locals of all ages.
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WHITBY
 
Just four decades ago, Whitby's rolling hills were home to thousands of sheep - now they're home to thousands of families. Since the first houses sprouted in 1971, this master-planned community has been the fastest-growing suburb in the greater Wellington region. It is now with an estimated 12,000 residents-and-counting - and the largest choice of residential housing in all of Porirua. Think quiet, tree-lined neighbourhoods of wide, curving streets and cul-de sacs with nautical names like The Anchor, The Mainsail and Longitude Place - and the water views to match. Its carefully-planned development has seen Whitby championed as a bold vision of what a suburb should be, but call it a satellite suburb and you'll get short shrift. Residents think of Whitby as a village in its own right, with a strong community spirit and people who really do borrow cups of sugar from their neighbours. - See more at: http://www.livebeyond.co.nz/suburb/whitby#sthash.TnRj3NYz.dpuf
Just four decades ago, Whitby's rolling hills were home to thousands of sheep - now they're home to thousands of families. Since the first houses sprouted in 1971, this master-planned community has been the fastest-growing suburb in the greater Wellington region. It is now with an estimated 12,000 residents-and-counting - and the largest choice of residential housing in all of Porirua. Think quiet, tree-lined neighbourhoods of wide, curving streets and cul-de sacs with nautical names like The Anchor, The Mainsail and Longitude Place - and the water views to match. Its carefully-planned development has seen Whitby championed as a bold vision of what a suburb should be, but call it a satellite suburb and you'll get short shrift. Residents think of Whitby as a village in its own right with a strong community spirit.
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